Judge This!

At what point does forgiveness outweigh condemnation? If we condemn – for how long does this sentence last? If we forgive – what makes this reaction more valid than condemnation? Which is the greater path – forgiveness or condemnation? Forgiveness needs to come in for questions if u ask me.

We all judge and we all know we do.

But do we judge our judging? The questions posed above – how does your judgment work with regards to your treatment of others?

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5 thoughts on “Judge This!

  1. Great question!

    Forgiveness always trumps condemnation. Forgiveness is the ultimate expression of love.

    The law must be upheld. We forgive, but the law will do it’s condemning work, anyway. The price of the transgression will be paid.

    The ony one that can truly forgive is God. Because we are sinnners at heart, I think we are tainted and do not love and forgive freely.

    That is why Jesus told us to forgive our enemies. Sure he wants us to do it. But He knew that we could not do it, in the pure and pefect way that He can, and does do it. So that word accusses us, and condemns us, also.

    He forgave those that murdered Him.

    In Him, and Him alone can we find true forgiveness.

    My 2 cents.

  2. Perhaps the validity in forgiveness comes from the point behind it? And how one defines forgiveness? Is forgiveness simply letting go of negative feelings? Is it letting go of something justly owed to you? Or is it reconciliation?

    For me, I’m not sure every situation calls for forgiveness, depending on how it should be used. If you find that you need to forgive someone to repair a relationship with them, or let go of the anger, and that is the healthiest thing for all involved, then forgiveness could trump everything else.

    However, you might also be afraid that if you forgive the other person, you’ll allow yourself to be put back in a position that caused the harm in the first place (I’m talking severe harm here, such as emotional damage). The condemnation one feels towards the other person might be the only thing keeping that person safe.

  3. “The condemnation one feels towards the other person might be the only thing keeping that person safe.”

    You’ve got a real point there, Jason.

    I can see that happening, for sure.

  4. “However, you might also be afraid that if you forgive the other person, you’ll allow yourself to be put back in a position that caused the harm in the first place” (OSS)

    True.

    I tend to think forgiveness, as much is this is never touched on in the bible, is more for ourselves than for the other person. The reconciliation can happen – but its something we desire. Forgiveness allows us to release a lot of hurt and anger – but it means little to someone else because they do not feel the impact of that ‘letting go’.

    What I have learned is forgiveness is continual process (the 70 x 7 idea) – it cannot happen all at once sometimes – it takes time to flesh out all of what has happened to us at the hands of others (mentally, emotionally, physically, or spiritually). We get quite effected by others – and to unravel all of that takes some time – so we can begin a pattern of forgiveness – that leads unto more and more as things come known.

    I think reconciliation can only occur after a true battle with forgiveness has already taken place – if that process is not started I am not sure 2 people can really connect (that hurt each other prior)? For some this is an option – for others this step can easily be forgone and done without – some things cannot be reconciled.

    My point from the post is my forgiveness (my mercies) are greater than my condemnation for sins/wrong-doings against me. It’s just the way I am and have been for so long now…I never felt good about not releasing someone from their pain.

    The post is in response to a post about abortion and the condemnation I felt in the wording being used – it was just ‘murder’ and discussing the ‘crime’ and the ‘sentence’ – and I began wondering when does our forgiveness outweigh our personal convictions? Unless, in this court of law, the law is mercy first and foremost?

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