Why Unbelief Might Be Godly?

He modernized his religion. Let’s modernize it again to just say, love your neighbor.” (Wolf)

There is a really a few good points here, however its theologically derived at so (go figure).

(a) Paul and James both cut out the ‘love God’ part and plainly say ‘loving your neighbor is a fulfillment of the law’…meaning they saw one’s actions towards others as their honor to God…at least that’s how I have always viewed that.

(b) In Paul’s letters there is a sense of growth from a child to an adult and growing up – moving from milk to meat so to speak. It isn’t to absurd to think that growth could include less reliance on God – since this would be about assuming the role of an adult complete with decision making skills and a knowledge of good/evil within each decision we make…also responsibility. Maybe part of a good Christians growth is losing notions of utter reliance on God? This can be argued as a notion that makes sense.

I also tend to view having no belief in God as something people arrive at – and if God cannot understand why then it is strange to me (since I can). Is God really that upset with unbelief for the right reasons?

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5 thoughts on “Why Unbelief Might Be Godly?

  1. I don’t think Paul or James were stressing a migration of reliance on God as part of spiritual maturity though.

    When you look at the verses there, it is in context of people wanting to revert back to the legalism of the mosaic law in the case of Paul and James is showing the differing scales that people used towards others depending on wealth and class. In my opinion, to truly love your neighbor as yourself, you need to have a reliance on God as I do not think it is possible any other way.

  2. “I don’t think Paul or James were stressing a migration of reliance on God as part of spiritual maturity though” (Xander)

    I think their intent includes both aspects of ‘love God and love humanity’ but it also can be read ‘love humanity is to love God’. When you really take a close look loving humanity is very tangible and shows great concern for the work of God (ie: creation).

    “In my opinion, to truly love your neighbor as yourself, you need to have a reliance on God as I do not think it is possible any other way.” (Xander)

    I think it is very possible to love your neighbor and have little to no concern for God on the issue. in fact I see it all the time in society. Which is why I arrive at the idea ‘loving your neighbor is tantamount to loving God’ (theologically speaking).

  3. I completely agree: you can love your neighbor without any concern for God. Belief in God is not necessary to be a loving and good person. Atheists aren’t all evil and hateful criminals. I know atheists who are completely selfless and loving people, and I know deeply devoted religious believers who are selfish and nasty people.

    My personal belief is that God is love and that, because we are made in His image, we have the same ability to love as God does. Not necessarily the same amount or intensity, but the feeling we call love is identical to the feeling God calls love. So I also agree that loving your neighbor is tantamount to loving God, even if you yourself don’t personally believe in God, because God is love and I believe that God loves it when we love each other. I hope that makes sense. I’m not the best at putting some of these concepts into words.

  4. Sammy, I think your point was stated well – its something I tend to believe because, like you, have seen the same trend with atheists and Christians – concerning treatment of people. Some of the nicer people I know don’t really want to have anything to do with God – I don’t blame them – but I still how nice they are as people.

  5. Pingback: Unbelief Could Delay You. | GodLovesBummyla

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